The Ant Hill

It was afternoon when two boys went up the ranch to play.

Outside the fences, they saw an abandoned truck.

They approached it and went inside.

One took the driver’s seat but the other protested and tackled his playmate.

Suddenly, the vehicle closed all its door on its own and started running.

They shrieked so loud that even sleeping forest creatures would wake up.

Rolling downhill, the truck accelerated even faster as it approaches the cliff.

Then the vehicle suddenly stopped.

Tumigil yata (Maybe it stopped).”

Unhurt, they went out and saw something.

Hala, punso! (An ant hill!)”

As they hurriedly ran away, a nuno sa punso (goblin of the anthill) looks at his shattered home.

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22 thoughts on “The Ant Hill

    • Hello Sarah,

      I’ll heed your advice. I won’t go for the exact 100-words quota next time. This one is challenging since I don’t have access to computers now. For this post, I used the post-by-email option with the help of my low-end mobile phone and using the free wifi signal from our neighbor. I’ll edit this when I get back to our home. Thanks for visiting.

    • I agree with Sarah. There have been a few posts that I have written that would have been a lot better had I used a couple more or fewer words…
      Great thrill ride! Poor dwarf. I hope he can rebuild. ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Whoa. If it is just the imagination of the boys? That’s an interesting view. The entire story is paranormal/fantasy. Thanks for visiting again, V.L. Gregory-Pohlenz. I’ll check out yours.

    • Hello Irene,

      Are you familiar with the white dwarves and their powers? I used to be scared of ant hills when I was younger. Thanks for visiting again. Heading to your story now.

      Cheers!

  1. Allen, I am interested in the white dwarf. Did he live in the ant hill, or in the truck? It was a great story all around, but I’m particularly interested in that dwarf.

    • Yes. That’s right. You need to acknowledge the presence of the nuno, who is actually a goblin and not a dwarf according to Philippine mythology. Hehe. Also, nuno literally means grandfather or ancestor and they are easily pissed off.

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